Migration from the KQ Implementation

Jason J. W. Williams jasonjwwilliams at gmail.com
Wed May 4 12:25:28 EDT 2011


On the rare occasions where that happens you can usually use zdb to coax the file system into mounting and then get your data off. 

http://www.cuddletech.com/blog/pivot/entry.php?id=980

Keep in mind ext4 is nowhere near as stable in a crash as ZFS. It really does need an fsck. 

Sent via iPhone

Is your e-mail Premiere?

On May 4, 2011, at 2:51, "Fajar A. Nugraha" <list at fajar.net> wrote:

> On Wed, May 4, 2011 at 3:43 PM, Matthew Robbetts <wingfeathera at gmail.com> wrote:
>>> Which brings me to another, somewhat tangential point. Sun and Oracle have thus far failed to provide a fsck tool for ZFS. In the absence of such a tool from an official source, is there a future plan/intention for providing such a thing within the scope of this project? I know that ZFS is supposedly designed so that it is always consistently recoverable, but I know of several cases at work where this wasn't the case after a crash, using pure stable Solaris.
>> 
>> 
>> Would such a tool be needed? I've always thought that scrub provides all of the features of fsck but is also able to work online. Is this not the case?
> 
> In the past there have been some cases where users are unable to mount
> the disk due to various problems (mostly because the disk "lie" about
> whether it has committed writes). The approach taken by Sun to fix
> this problem is to do some "checks" and "fix" during pool import time
> (i.e. somewhat similar to journal reply on ext3/4). One might argue
> that since ext4 still needs fsck, the same thing is also true for zfs.
> But AFAIK there's no such plan in Oracle to create fsck-like tool for
> zfs.
> 
> Scrub is a different matter altogether, designed to detect block
> corruption in used disk space.
> 
> -- 
> Fajar



More information about the zfs-discuss mailing list